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Is the Trinity found in Isaiah 6?

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Trinitarians make the claim that the doctrine of Trinity can be found in the book of Isaiah, chapter 6. For example you can see missionary Sam Shamoun of Answering-Islam propagating this false belief:

http://www.answering-islam.org/Shamoun/isaiah6_trinity.htm

The Trinitarians claim that Isaiah chapter 6; verses 1-13 prove that God is Triune. We quote the verses for you:

 

1 In the year that king Uzziah died I saw also the LORD sitting upon a throne, high and lifted up, and his train filled the temple.  2 Above it stood the seraphims: each one had six wings; with twain he covered his face, and with twain he covered his feet, and with twain he did fly.  3 And one cried unto another, and said, Holy, holy, holy, is the LORD of hosts: the whole earth is full of his glory.  4 And the posts of the door moved at the voice of him that cried, and the house was filled with smoke.

  5 Then said I, Woe is me! for I am undone; because I am a man of unclean lips, and I dwell in the midst of a people of unclean lips: for mine eyes have seen the King, the LORD of hosts.  6 Then flew one of the seraphims unto me, having a live coal in his hand, which he had taken with the tongs from off the altar:  7 And he laid it upon my mouth, and said, Lo, this hath touched thy lips; and thine iniquity is taken away, and thy sin purged.  8 Also I heard the voice of the Lord, saying, Whom shall I send, and who will go for us? Then said I, Here am I; send me.

  9 And he said, Go, and tell this people, Hear ye indeed, but understand not; and see ye indeed, but perceive not.  10 Make the heart of this people fat, and make their ears heavy, and shut their eyes; lest they see with their eyes, and hear with their ears, and understand with their heart, and convert, and be healed.  11 Then said I, Lord, how long? And he answered, Until the cities be wasted without inhabitant, and the houses without man, and the land be utterly desolate,  12 And the LORD have removed men far away, and there be a great forsaking in the midst of the land.  13 But yet in it shall be a tenth, and it shall return, and shall be eaten: as a teil tree, and as an oak, whose substance is in them, when they cast their leaves: so the holy seed shall be the substance thereof. 

 

The Trinitarian argues that since the seraphim's said Holy three times, this must refer to a triune God. For starters this is not an argument, nor proof of anything. The only reason why a Trinitarian believes it implies something is because he believes God is made up of three persons. Since the Trinitarian already has a preconceived idea of God, he has already made his mind up and has read into the text. He reads the text, and he sees what he wants to see, the text says holy three times, and since he believes in three, he assumes that it refers to three Lords.

Secondly, if the Trinitarian to read on they would see that the immediate words to come refute the Trinitarian contention:

And one cried unto another, and said, Holy, holy, holy, is the Lordof hosts

Notice how the verse continues and says the holy one is the Lord of hosts, it does not say the holy one is the lords of host, but rather is the Lord of hosts. You can see that it refers to a singular person, not a plural of persons. If the seraphim's saying holy three times meant there were three different persons, then the seraphim would have said lords instead of lord.

Therefore the entire basis of the argument falls apart from this. In fact the verse gets worst for the Trinitarian as we continue to read the verse in question:

And one cried unto another, and said, Holy, holy, holy, is the LORD of hosts: the whole earth is full of his glory

As you can see the verse says the world is full of his glory, not their glory.

So everything in the passage indicates that God is singular here, that he is one, not pluralistic and made up of three persons. If he was triune it would have said lords, as well saying their rather than his.

In fact the opening line of Isaiah chapter 6 refutes the Trinity:

In the year that king Uzziah died I saw also the LORD sitting upon a throne, high and lifted up, and his train filled the temple

So Isaiah says he saw the Lord, and he saw the lord sitting on a throne, singular, he does not say he saw the lord sitting on thrones. Everything he is saying is referring to a singular being, Isaiah saw the Lord, and the Lord was sitting on the throne.  Lastly Isaiah says his train filled the temple, he refers to the Lord as His, meaning singular, not as them being plural.

If Isaiah 6 was about the Trinity it would and should read like this:

In the year that king Uzziah died I saw also the LORDS sitting on thrones, high and lifted up, and their train filled the temple

When we read verse 5 of Isaiah chapter 6 we continue to see the basis for a Triune God being refuted, verse 5 reads:

Then said I, Woe is me! for I am undone; because I am a man of unclean lips, and I dwell in the midst of a people of unclean lips: for mine eyes have seen the King, the LORD of hosts

Isaiah says he saw the king of hosts, not the kings of host. 

The Trinitarian will now cite verse 8 that reads:

Also I heard the voice of the Lord, saying, Whom shall I send, and who will go for us

The Trinitarian claims that this verse explicitly proves that God is triune, they say this because God says us, and the Trinitarian concludes that God is made up of more than one persons since he says us.

For starters the context of a verse and the context of a chapter are very important. We have already seen the context of Isaiah 6 explicitly showing that God is singular, not plural. We cannot ignore these facts that have been indicated by Isaiah, that God is singular, therefore in light of this we can now understand passage 8 in its proper context and meaning.

Since we have already established that God is singular in Isaiah 6, it becomes clear that when he refers to himself as US it does not mean he is pluralistic, or else we have a contradiction. Therefore it becomes clear that when God says US, it is using what is called the plural majesty, a very common usage of language. Here is the basic definition of the majestic plural:

The majestic plural (pluralis majestatis in Latin) is the use of a plural pronoun to refer to a single person holding a high office, such as a monarch, bishop, pope, or university rector. It is also called the "Royal'we'" or the "Victorian'we'." The more general word for the use of we to refer to oneself is nosism

Now if a Christian is not satisfied with this response, then there is another.

When God says US he could be referring to both himself, as well as the seraphim’s that are accompanying him. In fact this is most likely the more plausible answer, because if we read the passages we read:

Then flew one of the seraphims unto me, having a live coal in his hand, which he had taken with the tongs from off the altar:  7 And he laid it upon my mouth, and said, Lo, this hath touched thy lips; and thine iniquity is taken away, and thy sin purged.  8 Also I heard the voice of the Lord, saying, Whom shall I send, and who will go for us? Then said I, Here am I; send me.

So notice a Seraphim approached Isaiah and cleanses him, and then God says who will go for US, the context of the passages indicate that the US is referring to both God and the seraphim's.

So in conclusion Isaiah chapter 6 does not teach that God is triune, Isaiah 6 is a great chapter for a Unitarian Christian, and Muslim position, that God is one, not three in one.

 

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